O'Brien County Plaques and Memorials


Did you ever drive past a marker, wonder what it said, but never stopped.

We hope this guide helps you relate to your roots and guides you to stop sometime.

For now--until all the county markers are researched--we present what we have on this page. Later each marker may get a thumbnail here and a page of its own. Email me with suggestions for other markers that are in the county.



Along Highway 18

MapQuest Map
Plaque on its base, 81 kbytes Text on the plaque, 70 kbytes
HISTORICAL RECORD
ON MAY 26, 1871, FOUR YOUNG PIONEERS FROM
EASTERN IOWA, TRAVELING IN A PRAIRIE SCHOONER
LOCATED THE GOVERNMENT SURVEY MARKER AT THIS
CORNER, FROM WHICH, WITH THE AID OF A COMPASS
AND A RAG TIED AROUND THEIR WAGON WHEEL,
LOCATED ON THE UNBROKEN PRAIRIE OTHER SECTION
CORNERS AND THEIR FOLLOWING HOMESTEADS.
ROLAND H. COOK
AUGUSTUS HERRICK
CHAS W. TOOTHAKER
JAMES McFARLAND
NW ¼ SEC 2
NE ¼ SEC 12
NW ¼ SEC 12
NW ¼ SEC 32
CARROLL TOWNSHIP
CARROLL TOWNSHIP
CARROLL TOWNSHIP
FLOYD TOWNSHIP
IN GRATEFUL REMEMBERANCE IS THIS MEMORIAL ERECTED
BY THEIR SONS.


At Waterman Wilderness Area

MapQuest Map
Monument overlooking valley, 62 kbytes To readable plaque, 44 kbytes To readable sign, 57 kbytes
THIS TABLET MARKS THE SITE
OF THE FIRST SETTLEMENT
IN O'BRIEN COUNTY MADE BY
HANNIBAL H. WATERMAN,
WIFE AND CHILD IN JULY 1856.
THE FIRST FORT, FIRST TOWN
AND COUNTY SEAT,
"OLD O'BRIEN"
WAS LOCATED ON THIS HOMESTEAD
ANNA WATERMAN
WAS THE FIRST WHITE CHILD
BORN IN THE COUNTY 1857.
THE INDIANS STOPPED HERE
ON THEIR WAY TO THE
SPRIRIT LAKE MASSACRE IN 1857.
(ornamentation)
ERECTED BY THE
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
OF O'BRIEN COUNTY



At Wittrock Area

DOI
INDIAN VILLAGE SITE
WITTROCK AREA
HAS BEEN DESIGNATED A
REGISTERED NATIONAL
HISTORIC LANDMARK
UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE
HISTORIC SITES ACT OF AUGUST 31, 1955
THIS SITE POSSESSES EXCEPTIONAL VALUE
IN COMMEMORATING AND ILLUSTRATING
THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
1964
The setting of the plaque above.The view around the Wittrock area
View looking across the Village site, toward Mill Creek. In the foreground is the plaque shown above.This looks the oppposite direction. In spring,
beautiful--I wonder how they fared in winter?
Below, the rather weathered sign describing the past structure and present remains. There are ticks in the area, so be prepared.


This sign explains the village construction.

Mill Creek Indian Fortified Village 1100-1400 AD
The ancient Mill Creek Indians built this village
and lived here for about 300 years. They made
their living hunting bison and cultivating corn,
beans, and squash. Living here was dangerous in
those days and the villagers found it necessary
to build substantial fortifications to protect
themselves from other Indians.
Posts have been set along parts of the north and
south stockade. The original stockade completely
surrounded the village. Posts were set to make a
solid stockade wall. Inside the wall the villagers
built 20 rectangular earth lodges 20 by 30 ft. in
size and set 2 ft deep in the ground. Each lodge
had a central fireplace and storage pits and was
entered by way of an entrance tunnel. Excavation
in 1965 by the state archaeologist first disclosed
the existence of the stockade and house type.
This is a state preserve and unauthorized digging
is prohibited by law.


Assembled by ovk. Last updated 2/06/2003.
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